Articles

Social Engineering Criminals May Be Targeting Your Organization: Are You Vulnerable?

Human-based social engineering fraud (sometimes referred to as human hacking) is defined as the art of influencing people to disclose information and getting them to act inappropriately.

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Form 1095 – Employee Communications

Many employers want to provide some type of communication along with or before the distribution of Form 1095s to relevant employees. Although any employee communication must be tailored to meet the employer’s specific circumstances, some general concepts are addressed here that can be adjusted as appropriate to help employees understand why Form 1095s are being provided, what type of information they provide, and how they are to be used.

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Preparing For The Snow

That preparation should include a review of the business’ insurance portfolio, specifically the ingress & egress coverage, and civil authority coverage of the business’s property policy.
Most standard property policies usually only cover loss “caused by direct physical loss of or damage to property.” Therefore, if a company has a roof collapse due to heavy snow load, it is likely the building and the resulting interruption of business would be covered by the policy. However, if the building or property is not damaged, and the business cannot operate due to the inability of access to the plant, building, or facility due to the weather, is that a covered loss under the property policy? The answer is, “It depends.”

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How to Prepare for a Data Breach in Healthcare

To ensure proper data breach response preparedness (and to show proper due diligence), your directors and leadership staff should be asking I.T. and key partners the pertinent questions now, before a breach occurs:
Have we ever had system penetration testing done, and have we reviewed the results?

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Cadillac Tax – Delayed

In December, the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2016 was signed into law which, amongst other provisions, effectively delayed the excise tax on high-cost health coverage (also known as the “Cadillac Tax”) until January 1, 2020. In addition, the law made the excise tax deductible and provides for a study to determine whether appropriate age and gender benchmarks are being used to determine the Cadillac tax threshold adjustments.

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